poisonous pulchritude



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vintagegal:

Bettie Page c. 1950s

vintagegal:

Bettie Page c. 1950s

(via anotherpureriot)

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Someday, I’ll be a movie star. That’s it. And I’ll be rich and famous and have all the friends I want. - Candy Darling

Someday, I’ll be a movie star. That’s it. And I’ll be rich and famous and have all the friends I want. - Candy Darling

(Source: robertdarling, via teinisensaatio)

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skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via vintagegal)

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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Nea Agnes Momirski
Shrinking to fit the Memory

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Nea Agnes Momirski

Shrinking to fit the Memory

(via mudwerks)

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nevver:

Japan diaries, Formento & Formento

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magictransistor:

Electrical oscillator (Nikola Tesla), nd.

magictransistor:

Electrical oscillator (Nikola Tesla), nd.

(Source: splattergut, via mudwerks)

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asylum-art:

The crocheted art of Joana Vasconcelos

The incredible work of this artist, closely linked to the handmade fabric. Joana Vasconcelos was born in Paris in 1971. Lives and works in Lisbon and is one of the most interesting Portuguese artist. Their firm is among the most cited of international news. His work combines the popular and the conceptual, industrial design and a very peculiar poetic point of view that combines the intimate and exposed.

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Max Ernst, from his second collage-novel ”Rêve d’une Petite Fille qui voulut entrer au Carmel (A Little Girl Dreams of Taking the Veil)”
 Éditions du Carrefour, Paris, 1930s.

Max Ernst, from his second collage-novel ”Rêve d’une Petite Fille qui voulut entrer au Carmel (A Little Girl Dreams of Taking the Veil)”

 Éditions du Carrefour, Paris, 1930s.

(Source: kirgiakos, via gh2u)

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sydneyflapper:

Pola Negri c. 1920’s

sydneyflapper:

Pola Negri c. 1920’s

(via lushlight)

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heart-shaped-apple:

developing Bettie

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The Wizard of Oz (1939)

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

(Source: vintagegal, via vintagegal)

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billdomonkos:

Kiss (Bill Domonkos, 2013)
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lyssahumana:

Kate!

lyssahumana:

Kate!